Ratatouille … One recipe… A big pot and so many yummy meals

This hearty country dish from the Provence region of France (Nice) is an easy mix of seasonal vegetables, garlic, aromatic herbs and olive oil.

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And yes, ratatouille is one of the summer dishes per excellence, not only in Provence but now in each region of France. In my family, we cook each time a large quantity, we enjoy this yummy vegetable stew with couscous, or we use the leftover as the main ingredient for different recipes during a week period.

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In my family, we plant tomatoes and zucchinis and we harvest a lot of them (giant zucchini!). Then, my sister in law – Isabelle spend some days during her holidays canning and/or freezing ratatouille. When I am in France, visiting them for Xmas, I have the opportunity to enjoy the taste of the sunny vegetables.

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I think it is time to cook and enjoy with amazing dish. This is my recipe:

Prep Time: 40 min                   Cook Time: 1 hour 20 min                     Yield: 6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

4 large tomatoes

6 medium (or 3 large) zucchinis

4 small eggplants

3 medium bell peppers (one green, one red, one yellow)

1 onion

4 shallots

4 garlic cloves

1 bouquet garni (1 bay leaf, 3 sprigs thyme, 3 to 4 curry leafs (facultative – it can be replaced by any aromatic herbs you like), 2 sprigs marjoram, 5 to 7 sprigs parsley)

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What is a bouquet garni?

It is a bunch of herbs that is added to casseroles, stocks, sauces and soups. It traditionally comprises parsley (or parsley stalks, which have lots of flavour), a few sprigs of thyme, a bay leaf and other aromatics. These herbs may be bundled into a strip of leek or a piece of celery stalk, or tied in a muslin bag or with string, to keep them together during cooking and allow easy removal before serving

Basil

5 tablespoons olive oil, plus more if needed

Coarse salt and ground pepper

Preparation

Wash all vegetables under warm water with a soft brush.

Dice the onion and mince the shallots.

Roughly chop the peppers, zucchinis, eggplants, and tomatoes into bite-sized pieces. Mince two garlic cloves. The vegetables will be cooked in batches, so keep each one in a separate bowl.

Why I recommend to use “the sauté each vegetable separately” method?

This dry-heat/high-heat method not only cooks off a lot of water from the vegetables but it helps concentrating their flavors. Another positive point, each piece of vegetable can brown and caramelize, which deepens and rounds out the flavor of the dish. Finally, the last benefit is that you can season each vegetable properly and cook it to just the right texture.

Warm two tablespoons of olive oil in a large (at least 5 1/2-quart) Dutch oven or in a non stick pan over medium-high heat. Sauté the eggplant until it has softened and has begun to turn translucent, about 10 minutes. Transfer the eggplant to a bowl.

Add another tablespoon of oil to the pot (or pan) and sauté the peppers until they have also softened, about 5 minutes. Transfer the peppers to the bowl with the eggplants.

Add another tablespoon of oil to the pot (or pan) and sauté the zucchini with a generous pinch of salt until the zucchini has softened and is beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the zucchini to the bowl with the eggplants and peppers.

Add one tablespoon of oil to the Dutch oven pot and add the onion, shallots and a generous pinch of salt. Sauté until the onion and shallots have softened and are just beginning to brown, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and sauté until fragrant and just starting to turn golden, about 1 minute. Add the tomatoes, and continue cooking for another 5 minutes. Scrape up the brown glaze on the bottom of the pan if any (good flavors).

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Add all the vegetables (i.e. peppers, zucchinis and eggplants) into the pot as well as the bouquet garni and some ground pepper, and stir until everything is evenly mixed.

Bring the stew to a simmer, then turn down the heat to low, half cover with lid. Stirring occasionally, simmer for at least 20 minutes or up to 1 1/2 hours. Shorter cooking time will leave the vegetables in larger, more distinct pieces; longer cooking times will break the vegetables down into a silky stew.

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I cook my ratatouille for 45 minutes (in general) at low heat and as you can see in the different pictures posted in this blog the pieces of vegetable are still distinct. With or without the lid, it really depends on how much juice I have in the pot – the idea is to reduce it if too much juice. Don’t rush your cooking process… I find cooking slowly helps to build and bring together the complexity of flavors.

Ten minutes before the cooking time ends, add two crushed garlic cloves and cover.

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Remove the bouquet garni. Sprinkle basil and a glug of good olive oil (if you want) over each bowl as you serve.

Leftovers can be refrigerated for a week or frozen for up to 3 months. Ratatouille is often better the second day, and it can be eaten cold, at room temperature, or warm.

Bonne Appetite!

Recipe Notes

If you want to make a smaller batch – cut in half the recipe and don’t be afraid to adapt it and use whatever vegetables you have.

You can add extra flavors – for something different, why not to try adding a tablespoon of smoked paprika, a pinch of red pepper flakes, 1/4 cup of red wine, or a splash of vinegar to the ratatouille. 

Ideas for using your leftover ratatouille:

Serve over couscous, barley couscous or polenta with or without grilled chicken or roasted lamb

Use a scoop of cold ratatouille as part of a Niçoise salad, along with steamed new potatoes, green beans, tuna in oil, black olives, and hard-cooked egg. Drizzle with a lemon-garlic vinaigrette

Sunny and sophisticated vegetable soup – add some cold chicken stock and a little anise-flavored Pernod and mix with a blender

Pulse it in a food processor to a chunky purée, add mustard, vinegar and a dash of Tabasco, and you’ve got a spread for your sandwich or a dip for your pita chips

Mix ratatouille with some chopped brine-cured black olives, capers or anchovies, hot sauce or grated orange zest and pile onto toasted baguette slices as an appetizer

The French way, try vegetable pie, savory gratin or crumble (the new cooking trend in France) and why not, a savory flan like clafoutis

A healthy Sunday brunch or breakfast – ratatouille with poach eggs in the center and a splash of hot sauce (you can also add some crème fraiche et cheese on the top of each egg)

Fill an omelette with ratatouille and crumbled goat cheese

Pasta dish with ratatouille, grated Parmigiano-Reggiano, and a few spoonfuls of pasta cooking water to loosen

Vegetarian lasagna

Nestle three jumbo shrimp (peeled and deveined) in individual gratin dishes filled with ratatouille. Top with Greek black olives, crumbled feta, and a drizzle of olive oil. Bake until the shrimp are pink and everything’s hot and bubbly, and serve as a first course

Grill some meaty fish steaks, such as halibut, tuna, or swordfish, and top with a spoonful of ratatouille and a squeeze of lemon

References for some of the “leftover use” suggestions:

The New Ratatouille

Ratatouille leftovers

French green salad with Imperial IPA beer jelly vinaigrette, pickled cherry and pecorino cheese

A green salad is the corner stone of every meal in France – It can be the first course, or a side dish with the main course for lunch, or your main dish with cheese or a hardboiled egg for dinner.

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One important aspect and characteristic of the French green salad is the vinaigrette or “sauce moutarde”. It must be very mustardy. This was, and is still like this in my family in Burgundy. A strong mustard, the Dijon mustard… is the star!

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As a French expatriate, there are some food products that I can’t live without… and mustard is number one in my list. I can eat American mustard with hot dogs or with my burger but not in a salad dressing. Dijon mustard was the one in France, Dijon mustard is still the one in Canada.

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And let you go, be a real French! Don’t be afraid to make things “au pif’ or “by the nose”. We do this all the time when it comes to salad dressing.

 

Good quality mustard, shallot and/or garlic, a mild but flavourful wine vinegar and a good vegetable oil. This is the perfect combination!

No red wine balsamic vinegar and extra virgin olive oil with Dijon mustard… There would be too much competition between so many good and tasty ingredients. You really want to taste and enjoy the flavor of the mustard.

Don’t get me wrong! I love red wine balsamic vinegar and extra virgin olive oil with salad or other vegetables but without mustard.

As a food artisan start-up, the beer jelly is my leading product. A breakthrough for me! it pairs so marvellously with cheeses (like pecorino cheese with peppercorns) and it is easy to use when you are cooking … a teaspoon here or there.

Imperial IPA beer jelly (because of the hops flavor) works perfectly in a salad dressing and complements very well the taste of the green leaves. It is a must to try! A simple dish like a green salad can be so tasty… a symphony of flavours. You won’t look behind you after.

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If you are not living in Toronto (e-commerce for Canada available soon on my company website), you can find a similar product in USA. If not, I suggest you replace the beer jelly with apple cider jelly or apple jelly. Try to find one that is not too sweet, and in this case use apple cider vinegar.

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I think it is time to cook, this is my recipe:

French Imperial IPA beer jelly vinaigrette

A few simple ingredients that can come together so well, when done right. A symphony of flavors!

 

Makes about 60 ml (1/4 cup), enough for one large green salad

Ingredients

A pinch (1/8 teaspoon) sea salt

1 tablespoon white balsamic wine vinegar

1/2 small shallot, peeled and minced (about 1 tablespoon) (facultative)

A generous teaspoon Dijon originale mustard like Maille

A generous teaspoon old style mustard like Maille

1 teaspoon of Imperial IPA beer jelly (or apple cider jelly or apple jelly)

3 to 4 tablespoons (45 ml to 60 ml) vegetable oil like sunflower

Fresh ground pepper

Fresh herbs, if desired

 

Preparation

In a large bowl, mix together the salt, vinegar, and shallot. Let stand for about ten minutes.

Shallot is the chic cousin of onion. When marinated in vinegar, it gets soften and adds an attention-grabbing flavor to the dressing because of its slight bite. A must, you need to try!

Mix in the two mustards, beer jelly (or apple cider jelly), then add 3 tablespoons (45 ml) of vegetable oil and freshly ground peppercorns. Stir well, then taste. If too sharp, add the additional vegetable oil and more salt, if necessary.

You can add fresh herbs, but it’s better to chop and mix them just before serving so they retain their flavor.

You can keep this salad dressing for about eight hours at room temperature. If you want to make it farther in advance, as I suggest previously, add the shallots and the fresh herbs closer to serving so they don’t loose their fragrance.

 

French green salad with pickled black cherry, pecorino cheese and Imperial IPA beer jelly vinaigrette 

4 servings            Preparation 15 minutes

 

Ingredients

1 Head red leaf lettuce (leaves torn) or a large bag of mixed baby green leaves

50 grams (1/4 cup) of pickled black cherry, pitted and sliced

100 grams (3 ounces) pecorino cheese with peppercorns, shaved or cut in small cubs

You can also use a local cheese like pepper potts cheese. This cheese is rubbed in freshly cracked pepper and aged for 18 months. it is a pasteurized sheep’s milk cheese made in Sudbury, Ontario. A traditional Tuscan-style pecorino recipe!

Salad dressing (recipe above)

Salt and peppercorn

 

Directions

In the large bowl that contains the French Imperial IPA beer vinaigrette, add the lettuce (or mixed green leaves), pickled cherries and half of pecorino and toss to coat. Top with rest of pecorino.

Add fresh ground peppercorns and salt if necessary.

Green Salad with Imperial IPA vinaigrette

Bon Appetite!

Roasted Duck Legs with Oatmeal Brown Ale Beer and Cherry Sauce

The first time I have discovered the possibility to cook duck with cherry was in France. My brother Jean Michel had offered me a cooking book for my 20th anniversary: Larousse Traditional French Cooking by Curnonsky.

Maurice Edmond Sailland was an interesting man. Better known by his pen-name Curnonsky, and dubbed the Prince of Gastronomy, he was the most celebrated writer on gastronomy in France in the 20th century. He was also a prolific fictional author (over 65 books and enormous numbers of newspaper columns) , a bon-vivant, a raconteur and a gourmand (he wrote several cookbooks). He is often considered the inventor of gastronomic motor-tourism as popularized by Michelin, though he himself could not drive.

He advocated simple food over complicated, rustic over refined, and he has often repeated the phrase:

Et surtout, faites simple!

And above all, keep it simple!

I have read his book like a captivating novel, I have prepared many of his recipes…and I have learnt so much from the 1, 5000 recipes he has collected in his cookbook. Thanks Jean Michel for this gift!

Duck and cherry, I have tried this combination many times – or something similar to this recipe – using the whole duck or the ]breasts with red Burgundy wine instead of beer. The first time, it was specifically for my grandfather Paul. Both my grandparents Adele and Paul had a farm and a luxuriant orchard and garden. I have spent so many summers with them, enjoying cooking and making jam and preserving with my grandmother Adele, harvesting the products of their farm and orchard with my grandfather Paul. It was a way to honor him … a fantastic roasted duck with his sour cherries. A little of nostalgia …. but also great memories!

I think it is time to cook, this is my recipe.

4 servings      Preparation 30 minutes            Cooking 2 hours and 15 minutes

 

Ingredients

4 duck legs, skin on

Salt and pepper

3 chopped shallots

3 cloves garlic, finely chopped

1 cup oatmeal brown ale beer

The recipe for this classic French dish is quite standard. You can use red wine or Porto as well as Stout, but I wanted something different, lighter and well balance. The red wine, like the stout, can be overpowering (thick and heavy sometime – more for winter cooking), and as a result, the cherries would play only a second role.

Left-Field-Brewing-First-edits-Photos-by-Mark-Horsley-4As a result, for this recipe, I have decided to use a brown Ale, more specifically the Oatmeal Brown Ale Eephus, from Left Field Brewery.

Left Field Brewery is my neighbour here in Toronto East. One among the vibrant local craft breweries in Ontario! I love to go there and order a sampling of their beers. I bring some food (like cherry), a book about pairing beer with cheese and/or food. I let my imagination wander, and I decide if one of their beers might be an interesting addition to my food and cooking research and development adventure.

Eephus Oatmeal Brown Ale (5.5% alcohol) is malty and nutty, well balanced but on the sweet side, with a touch of bitterness. The perfect pairing for the dark cherry!

The sauce is smooth with a mild but intricate rich flavor and a touch of bitterness. It balances perfectly the aroma of the dark cherry and work perfectly with duck. A must to try!

250 to 300 grams (1 ½ cups) dark sweet cherries

1 teaspoon soy sauce

1 tablespoon maple syrup

1 tablespoon butter

A few drops of Tabasco chipotle smoky sauce

Black pepper

Salt

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 F degree.

Pat the skin of the duck leg with a kitchen towel.

Prick the skin of the leg all over (taking care not to pierce the meat).

Season duck legs with salt and pepper.

Place the duck legs skin side down in a cold skillet large enough to accommodate them comfortably. Turn heat to medium, and cook until skin is scrip and mahogany colored (between 6 to 10 minutes). Turn legs over and cook until browned on the other side, about 2 to 4 minutes.

Transfer to a wire rack on a roasting tray (or a baking dish) and cook in the middle of the oven for 1 ½ to 2 hours for optimal outcome, i.e. until legs are very tender. Transfer legs to a platter and keep warm (cover with foil).

One thing you need to keep in mind, it is almost impossible to overcook duck legs. Don’t be afraid to let them for more than 1 hour in the oven. The first time I did this recipe, I worried so much and I have removed the duck legs after 50 minutes, mostly because the duck legs have exceeded the optimal cooking temperature of 180 F degree. Yes, for sure it was cooked but it was not tender. I put back in the over the second leg for an extra 40 minutes, and it was perfectly tender after spending extra time in the oven.

Then, these are my two advices: keep in mind the size of the leg (small, medium or large) and start to check if the duck is cooked and tender (using a knife) after 1 hour in the oven … and stay Zen!

Two more tips:

You can reduce the oven to 200 F degree and keep the duck in a warm environment until ready to serve for up to 1 hour.

To crisp the skin back up (it can become soft in the oven), preheat the broiler and place the duck under the broiler for a few minutes, keeping a very close eye to make sure the duck doesn’t burn.

Pour out the drippings from the skillet into a storage container and reserve it for later use.

While the duck is almost cooked, make the cherry sauce.

In the skillet used to brown the duck legs over medium high heat add 2 tablespoons duck fat from the reserved dripping. Add the shallots and cook until soft and lightly browned, about 5 minutes.

Stir in the garlic and cook until fragrant. Add brown ale, pitted cherries cut in half, soy sauce, maple syrup, Tabasco sauce and black pepper. Deglaze the pan by scraping the brown bits from the bottom of the pan (this is going to give an extra yummy taste to the sauce). Allow to boil, stirring frequently, until thickened, about 8 minutes.

Swirl in the butter and rectify seasoning if needed.

Spoon the sauce over the duck just prior to serving, or serve alongside.

The perfect side dish: potatoes as well as French green beans.

Bonne Appetite!

A little of science…

Some nutritional information about Duck:

Duck is not only a richly flavored meat well-suited to strong accompaniments like fruit and potent spices, it is also nutritious.

Duck is rich in dietary protein (11 grams per 100 grams), which helps boost satiety.

Despite the fact it is a significant source of saturated fat, duck is also a good source of monounsaturated fat (almost 50% of the total duck fat contain) – the same fat found in unrefined olive oil, avocados and pastured lard that is renowned for its ability to increase HDL (good cholesterol) and reduce the risk of heart disease. In fact, duck fat is situated between butter and olive oil when we compared their fat composition.

Duck meat is both mineral- and vitamin-rich. It is a rich source of niacin (vitamin B6 – 50% daily requirement per 100 grams serving):

This vitamin plays a vital role in the metabolism of fats in the body. It has also been established to have a cholesterol-lowering effect. Niacin helps to reduce low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol which when oxidized forms plaque in the blood vessels and increase the risk of heart disease. Good choice of meat if you want to promote your cardiovascular health.

Niacin also supports genetic processes. Components of cellular genetic material require niacin for their production. Inadequate niacin in the diet can cause DNA damage. Niacin also helps to stabilize blood sugar and regulates the metabolism of insulin. This makes duck a good dietary item for diabetics.

It is also a good source of riboflavin (12% daily requirement per 100 grams serving), selenium (43%) and iron (13%).

September is ….Tomato merry-go-around

It was really difficult to choose the recipes I will share with my guesses for this amazing dinner party. I love tomatoes and I cook them in so many different ways… all so yummy. These are some of my favorite recipes, new ones I have developed here in Canada as well as my family’s recipe: “les tomates farcies”. A must!

Join us in September to enjoy a dinner all focusing on tomatoes … savory and sweet … there is no limit!

tomato merry-go-around

Register at The Kingston Social

References for the pictures:

http://www.kireei.com/tomates-y-flores/

http://www.cuisineactuelle.fr/recettes/tomates-farcies-au-boeuf-hache-209505

http://www.showfoodchef.com/2010/08/tomato-canjam.html

A taste of Provence … this is our demo + dinner party for August

I don’t have to go back to France, I will simply cook some of my favorite Provencal dishes to feel “I am at home, with my friends and Family in the region of Avignon. Join us in August for a taste of Provence:

A taste of provence

We will published the recipes in August…

Register at The Kingston Social

Reference for the pictures:

http://french-riviera-blog.com/2012/03/24/a-walking-tour-around-the-old-town-of-nice-and-restaurant-guide/

http://www.pratique.fr/recette-ratatouille.html

http://www.pratique.fr/recette-ratatouille.html

Demo + Dinner at the Kingston Social – Toronto

Join us at the Kingston Social this summer, we will not only feature our products (Malty & Hoppy Delicacy) in different yummy recipes, we will also bring to light what mother nature has to offer us during the farmers’ market season…

poster demo plus cooking class

Register at The Kingston Social

Reference for the picture:

Brittany Wright – http://wrightkitchen.com/

Pork with onion rhubarb sauce

I love rhubarb. This is one of the first fruits that we can harvest in the garden.

Rhubarb, a perennial, is one of the easiest plants to grow in a northern garden, and it's one of the earliest local vegetables.

Rhubarb, a perennial, is one of the easiest plants to grow in a northern garden, and it’s one of the earliest local vegetables (http://www.nubimagazine.com/rhubarb-unsung-food-hero/) .

However, it is more than this for me. It is a lot of good souvenirs with my grandmother Adele, when we were cooking together. Her rhubarb jam was amazing … bright pale yellow color, the small pieces of rhubarb cooked slowly in sugar and still intact, the jam running a little bit (French way to do jam), easy to spread on a piece of fresh French baguette covered with butter. Yummy!

And each year since I am a teenager, I am cooking with rhubarb, predominantly deserts like pie, crumble, marmalade and jam of course.

But do you know that rhubarb is not a fruit but a vegetable?

I found this quite intriguing and this year I have decided to experiment a new avenue: a savory dish with rhubarb.

Pork and rhubarb, a delicious combination for a stew. The tanginess of the rhubarb is balanced perfectly by the sweetness of the onions, and this combination works perfectly with pork.

I think it is time to cook. This is the recipe:

Recipe for 6 to 8 servings

Preparation: 15 min

Cooking: 1 hour and 15 min

Adapted from Cuisine de A a Z

Ingredients

1 kg to 1.2 kg pork tenderloin or pork loin roast

1.2 kg rhubarb

40 grams butter or 2 tablespoons olive oil

4 sweet onions (medium size)

I did this recipe two times. The first time, the sauce was really watery. The second time, I decided to use less liquid (50 ml) and I almost burnt my dish. Better to keep an eyes on it. You can add more liquid if necessary, and if your sauce is too watery, you can reduce it a little bit before to serve it.

100 ml water

You can replace water with beer or wine. The first time I did this recipe, I used an American Pale Ale beer from Black Oak Brewery. You can also use a Blanche de Chambly from Unibroue. A light but flavourful beer is perfect!

The second time I use a white wine. My suggestions: pinot grigio or chardonnay

Salt and pepper

Directions

Heat the butter/olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the pork and cook, turning occasionally, until lightly brown on all sides, 5 to 7 minutes.

 

Add the minced onion, liquid, salt and pepper; cook over medium heat for 30 minutes.

Add the minced rhubarb, mix well with the onions; cook over medium heat for an extra 40 minutes.

Cut the pork into slices, arrange on a warm platter, and spoon sauce over the sliced pork.

Serve with rice, roasted sweet potatoes and/or French green beans.

Bonne Appetite!

French Canadian Tourtière (meat pie) with “Kentucky bastard” Beer Flavor

The first time I have tried the famous tourtière, it was during the carnival of Quebec in one of the oldest house of Quebec (1675), now a restaurant that serves traditional Quebec food: Aux Anciens Canadiens. Pickle and roasted red beets were served as a side dish. It was delicious!

Tourtière is not an exclusivity of Quebec. It is a traditional French-Canadian dish served by generations of French-Canadian families throughout Canada as well as in the bordering regions of the United States. In the New England region, especially in Maine, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts, the dish was introduced by the late 19th and early 20th century immigrants from Quebec.

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Combine together all the ingredients

From my trip to Quebec, I brought back a cookbook about the traditional cuisine in the different regions of Quebec. And while I was reading the book, I discovered that there is no one correct filling for the famous tourtière; it depends on what is regionally available. In coastal areas, seafood is commonly used, whereas pork, beef, rabbit and game are often included inland.

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Mix together and cook over medium heat

I never made a tourtière when I was in France. We have something similar – le paté en croute et la tourte à la viande (also with vegetable like mushrooms, fish or seafood). You can buy them anywhere in France and they are quite delicious when they are prepared artisanally. Why to do it, we buy them ready to eat.

And may be, because it is prepared by professionals in France, I always felt that it was too difficult or it took too long to prepare, and this until recently. Paul, a friend of mine, who is preparing 6 to 10 pies each year to share with friends during the holiday’s season, inspired me. I was ready to take the leap.

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When the meat is cooked, allow to cool to room temperature

This is Paul toutière’s recipe. I have made some minor changes. It is impossible for me to follow a recipe at 100%, but I kept the essence of his recipe as well as his instructions for the different steps. My conclusion, it is really easy to do. Unbelievable! It is also really delicious; I will do it again, and again. I think it is time to cook, this is my recipe.

Portion size: 8 to 10

Ingredients

900 g lean ground pork (2 pounds)

I doubled the quantity of meat (as well as all the other ingredients). After a first try, I thought it was not enough meat; I wanted to get back my souvenir of the tourtière I have enjoyed in Quebec.

I chose to use pork tenderloin. It is really lean and tasty. I also asked my butcher to grind it for me. America’s test kitchen has shown that freshly ground meat is significantly more tasty and flavorful than the pre-packed ground meat. And this makes a difference!

2 onions, diced

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/2 teaspoon marjoram

1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

2 bay leaves

4 to 6 fresh sage leaves (alternative: 1/2 teaspoon of ground sage)

120 ml Beer

Paul normally uses boiling water in his recipe. Instead, I have decided to use beer. Pork meat has a mild flavor that picks up whatever seasoning or marinades you use and I wanted to give some pep to my tourtière by using one of my favorite beers – or more precisely my first barleywine:

Kentucky bastard from Nickel Brook

As they explained, they kicked it up a notch with their Bolshevik Bastard Imperial Stout, aging it in Kentucky Bourbon barrels. The rich chocolate, coffee and dark fruit flavors from their Imperial Stout are married together with the vanilla, oak and warming alcohol from bourbon barrels. Together as one, the result is an incredible blend of aroma and taste. And this is true! We really enjoyed this beer, and I wanted to cook with it. My Burgundy roots! The tourtière was my first try; I also used this beer when I cooked a French onion soup. Both were incredible!

Recipe pastry for a 9-inch (23-cm) double crust pie 

300 g flour (150 grams all-purpose flour and 150 g spelt flour)

150 g of butter, cubed and very cold

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

80 ml very cold water, plus more is needed

Whisk together the flour and salt in a large mixing bowl.                                                    

Add the cubed butter to the flour mixture, and cut it using a pastry cutter (rubbing it in with your fingertips also works in a pinch). Keep working the butter into the dough until in coarse crumbs with a few larger pieces.

Scrape off any residual butter-flour mixture from the pastry cutter, and drizzle in the water.

Gently work the water into the dough with a rubber spatula or a wooden spoon until it becomes a shaggy but relatively cohesive mass. Give the dough a few kneads with your hands (fewer than 10) so that it forms a rough ball. Try to work these steps as fast as you can. This is one of the secrets for a flaky crust.

Wrap the ball in plastic wrap, and chill for at minimum 30 minutes or overnight. This allows the water to fully hydrate the dough, making for a more cohesive product that’s easier to roll out.

Preparation

In a saucepan, combine pork, onion, beer, salt, black pepper, marjoram, cloves as well as sage and bay leaves. Cook over medium heat until mixture boils; stirring occasionally. Reduce heat to low and simmer until meat is cooked, about 20 minutes.

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Roll out the bigger one and line a 9-inch clay pie pan with it

Remove the bay leaves and sage leaves, and almost all the juice and fat. You can use the juice to prepare a sauce to accompany your tourtière.

Adjust the seasoning if necessary. Allow to cool to room temperature.

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Brush with egg wash

The meat can be prepared one day in advance. Cover it and refrigerate overnight. I did it and it was perfect the day after to assemble the pie and cook it.

With the rack in the lowest position, preheat oven to 375 degrees F (220 degrees C).

On a lightly floured surface, cut dough in two pieces (roughly 60 and 40%). Roll out the bigger one and line a 9-inch (23 cm) clay pie pan with it.

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Spoon the meat mixture into the pie crust

Brush with egg wash (whisk an egg up with a splash of cold water or milk until pale yellow and perfectly mixed). Spoon the meat mixture into the pie crust.

Roll out remaining dough and cover the tourtière with it. Make an incision in the center. Press the edge to seal with a fork or your fingers. Brush with egg wash.

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Roll out remaining dough and cover the tourtière with it

Bake in preheated oven for 30 minutes.

Let cool 10 minutes before slicing.

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Make an incision in the center. Press the edge to seal with a fork or your fingers

Tourtière can be made up to 2 to 3 days in advance. We have kept our pie covered with aluminum foil in the fridge and we have reheated it at 250 degree F for 20 to 30 minute before to enjoy it.

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Brush with egg wash

As I said previously, the taste of this tourtière is incredible. We enjoyed every bite, we were in paradise for gourmands. A real alchemy between the pork flavor, the different herbs and the complexity of the “Kentucky Bastard” beer!

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Ready for the gournands!

Bon Appetite!